Hi,

welcome to this in-depth guide on using our online media monitoring and analytics tool – Mediatoolkit. Before we dive in, let’s talk about what is media monitoring and how it can help further your business.

Media Monitoring

Media monitoring is essentially the process of tracking mentions of your keywords across the Internet. Think of it as continuous googling that is based on crawling millions of web sources, including social media, forums, blogs, and comments in order to find your keyword the moment it is mentioned anywhere online.

In comparison to Google, media monitoring tools crawl more sources to find your keywords. Furthermore, they do the tiresome work for you – you don’t have to manually conduct searches day by day. Once you set up tracking a certain keyword, the tool will constantly search the Internet for it and display the results in your real-time feed.

Every mention of your keywords is also supported by additional information media monitoring tools track, such as information about the author, location, time of publishing, sentiment, reach, interactions, engagement rate, and influence score.

The tool will also notify you immediately when something important happens, like a sudden increase of mentions that could mean a crisis is emerging – but more on that later.

Social Listening

We would be remiss not to also mention social listening when talking about media monitoring.

Social listening is often the other name for media monitoring. The two go hand in hand but are not necessarily the same. As you track mentions about a certain brand, product or a topic, you get a glimpse of what, when, where, and why people and media are talking about.

When simply monitoring, you collect that data. When you are listening, you are reacting to that data. That is, you’re actively improving your strategy according to the insights into your customers’ behavior. In other words, monitoring enables you to know what, when, where, and listening explains why.

Hence, actually listening to your customers’ feedback and topics of interest might present great opportunities for your business. People tend to be very straightforward and unbiased online. This really enables you to get the most genuine information about the positives and negatives of anything you track.

Once you get such information, combined with powerful analytics options media monitoring and social media listening tools provide, the use-cases are pretty much endless.

Now that we’ve learned more about the process itself, let’s get into the more practical part. In the next section, we’ll go through all the key features used for conducting the most relevant searches.

1 What to Track

When it comes to monitoring all the relevant information surrounding a business, there are a few key aspects to keep in mind and consider tracking:

  • Your company name
  • Your brand(s)
  • Your product(s) and/or service(s)
  • Key people
  • Your industry
  • Your competitors

Tracking these six queries will ensure you get all the necessary data to be fully informed about the performance of your business, your competitor’s performance and stay on top of news and trends in your industry.

Of course, depending on the topic or subject in focus, you might want to add more queries or specify existing ones.

How to make more complex search queries will be described in the following chapters.

In this step-by-step process, we’ll explain how to share folders with your colleagues, invite other users to your organization and assign them a role.

2.1.1. Inviting colleagues

To invite colleagues into your organization, click on the small avatar icon on the right of SHARED FOLDERS:

The number on the left of the avatar icon represents the number of people with whom you’re already sharing your organisation (in this example, that is 3 people).

When you click on it, a new window will open:

To invite your colleagues, simply type their email address in the bar that says Add email address (1). On the right of that bar is a drop-down menu. In it you can assign each of your colleagues a role: view, edit, analyze, admin (2). Click here to see more on each role.

When you type in the email address, and assign a role to that person – click on the blue Add on the far right to add that person to your organization (3).

Once you click Add, a new bar will automatically appear above the added colleague.

You can repeat this process to add however many colleagues you want in your organization.

To finally invite them to your organization, click on the green Invite button.

Roles

Roles help you control the way you share your organization with others. For example, a colleague in charge of the sentiment analysis can be assigned an ‘Analyse’ role, whereas a colleague that does not manage communications can only be assigned a ‘View’ role in order to see everything, but without the possibility of changing your queries or inviting new people.

Admin

Admins can invite other colleagues in your company’s account, change your plan i.e. pricing options for your account and change the settings for an account. Admins can also add new queries, receive alerts, create reports and use other functionalities according to the plan.

Edit

The Editor is a user that can see and add queries that are placed in the organization folders of which they are members, can see reports and receive alerts, according to the plan.

Analyse

The Analyst is a user that can see queries that are placed in the organization folders of which they are members, analyse feeds (i.e. select sentiment, add tags, etc.), can see reports and receive alerts, according to the plan.

View

The Viewer is a user that can see queries that are placed in the organization folders of which they are members. Viewers can’t add any new queries, but can see reports and receive alerts, according to the plan.

 

Organization settings

To manage organization settings, click on the Settings button in the top right corner. Then click on Organization settings in the drop-down menu:

A new window will pop up:

In this window, you can:

1) Change roles: under Role, click on the drop-down menu and then click on the new role you want to assign to your colleague

2) Remove members from your organization: under Actions, click on the little X.

When you click on the X, a new window will pop up, asking if you are sure you want to remove that member from your organization:

If you do want to remove the selected member, just click on the green Yes button.

3) Invite members to your organization

Organization settings is just another way you can invite members to your organization. To do it, click on Invite your colleagues:

When you click on it, this window will pop up:

It’s the same window as before, so the process is the same, too. Just enter your colleagues’ emails, choose their role, and click Invite.

2.1.2. Sharing folders with colleagues

To share a specific folder with your colleagues, click on the Settings button on the right of the folder you want to share. Then, in the drop- down menu that pops up, click on Sharing options.

When you click on Sharing options, a new window will pop up. In it, you have two kinds of folders: Shared and Team folders.

Shared folders are shared with all members of your organization.

Team folders are shared with anyone you select. Newly added members will not be added to this folder automatically. You can use this to share some folders with only certain people or departments within an organization.

You can choose to add newly invited colleagues to a specific folder by clicking on the box on the left of that member’s name (as shown in the picture below – colleague3). If you invited more new members, you can share the folder with all of them at once by clicking on the Select all option (also shown at the picture below).

When you’re done, just click the green Save button.

2.2. Setting up queries

Time to set up your (first) query! Here’s a step-by-step guide on everything you need to know about the process of creating and editing your queries to get the most relevant results possible. Let’s start.

2.2.1. Creating your first query

The first thing you’ll see upon logging into your account for the first time is the screen in the picture below, where you’ll be presented with two options. Now’s the time to choose whether you want to track keywords or phrases, or select a specific source.

Let’s go with the first one: Keywords and phrases. When you click on it, the next step will be to write your keyword(s). You can write one, or more, which you can later easily edit, so don’t worry if you don’t get it right the first time. Just remember to press Enter once you’ve written your keyword or a phrase.

If you add a comma after every word, a window will pop up with options to choose whether you really wanted to track the phrase including the commas, or you simply forgot to press Enter instead of adding commas after your keywords:

Choose whichever option you had in mind and click Save.

The number of keywords you can enter is unlimited, but make sure to track only the ones you find could be relevant to your query. Otherwise, the results you get will not be as precise as they are when the right keywords are used.

2.2.2. Fine-tuning search parameters

1) Refine your search

The next step will be refining your search (if you wish to do so). Here you can add words you want the tool to track (number 1 in the picture below), or the ones you want to exclude from the search results (number 2)

You might have noticed the Advanced settings option at the bottom. The advanced settings enable you to further specify your keywords and phrases by using Boolean operators, more on which you can read in the next chapter: “Boolean operators explained”.

On the right of the picture above, you can see a guide for the Boolean operators available while typing in your keywords. Scroll down to find all of them, as well as examples of their use. Here’s how the process of using Boolean operators to refine your results could look like:

This ensures you only get results related to Blueberry the phone, and not blueberry the fruit, as you’ve excluded the fruit using the AND NOT operator (more on this later, though).

If you don’t want to use Advanced options, simply click on Back to basic options to return to the prior step:

Click on Next to proceed to Global filters.

2) Specify Global filters

Here’s where you can choose to specify numerous settings such as the preferred language, location, author, influence score or sentiment of your mentions.

Once again, you can include or exclude languages, for example. Mediatoolkit tracks mentions in any language in the world, so your feed might get crowded if you don’t specify any. It all depends on what your media monitoring needs are – covering all the mentions across the globe, or being more specific with the aforementioned filters. 

By clicking on the arrow next to the filter, you get the option to include or exclude something. We could say we want the tool to track mentions in English specifically, and not in French. The same principle can be applied for Locations and Authors filters as well. Then, let’s say we want the tool to track mentions with an Influence score from 7 to 10. This is extremely useful when you track industry news, for example, and want to get updates only from the most relevant sources. We could also set whether we want only positive or negative mentions in our feed, or combine a few so that more categories are included.

A more detailed look into these filters is available in a later chapter: “Setting up filters”.

3) Select sources to track

Following up on Global filters are the Sources category:

By scrolling down this window, you can see all available sources and choose any source/channel you wish to track or exclude one (or more) sources. For example, you might want to track mentions of your brand from Twitter and TripAdvisor only.

4) Preview the results

When you have decided which sources you want the tool to track, simply click on Preview resultsto see how the settings you’ve chosen will affect the results you’d get.

To confirm your set-up query, click on the green Next button at the bottom right corner of the Preview window.

5) Naming your query

The last step in setting up your query is naming it and choosing a folder in which you want your query to be organized. This can be an already existing folder, or you can create a new one:

To create a new folder, click on +New Group in the drop-down menu, as shown in the picture above. When you click there, a new option will appear – Choose new group name:

To save your query, click on the green Save button at the bottom right corner:

2.2.3. Editing queries

If you find you’re not getting the results you hoped for, you might want to edit your query. It’s quite simple – click on the Edit query next to the query title on top of your feed:

The other option is to go to the list of folders and queries on the left side, click on the Settings button () and choose Edit query:

More on this in a later chapter: “Setting up filters”.

2.2.4 Deleting, moving and adding a new query

To delete a query, go to the list of folders and queries on the left side, click on the Settings button () and choose Delete:

To add a new query, click on +Add new query located underneath your existing queries:

To move a query, i.e. relocate a query from one folder to another, click on the Settings button next to your query and choose the Move keyword option:

That will open a new window, in which you can choose the exact folder to which you want to move your query:

You can either type in the folder you want to move it to, or choose one from a drop-down menu (drop-down menu pictured above).

To conclude

Creating and editing your queries should be a very easy and straightforward process if you follow these directions. If you’re still not managing to get relevant results or need any help at all, don’t hesitate to reach out to our Customer Service team. 

You can click on the chat button in the lower-right part of your screen, or click on Help on your upper-right while using the tool, and then on Help me filter results:

You can choose to have someone from our team contact you in the way that suits you best (phone, email, etc.):

2.3. Boolean operators explained

Boolean operators are simple words that, when combined with your keywords, extend or narrow your search and thus refine the results of a query.

Why use them, you might ask? Boolean operators can help you focus a search and connect various pieces of information to find exactly what you’re looking for. They might seem intimidating at first, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll be advancing your searches in no time!

In this tutorial, we’ll go through all of them to help you define what exactly you’re searching for and get the most relevant results possible.

2.3.1. Basic options

The first time you’ll encounter Boolean operators is while on the second step of setting up a query. Here’s a list of all basic boolean operators:

  • OR
  • AND
  • AND NOT

Unbeknownst, you’ve actually already been using the OR operator when adding multiple keywords without explicitly entering the operator itself. So, let’s start with that one.

OR

When you add multiple keywords, you basically tell the tool to track either one of those in order to get the desired results. So, for example, you can track ‘marketing news’, ‘marketing updates’ and ‘marketing trends’ to be in the loop with the latest events in the marketing world:

The tool sees this as “marketing news” or “marketing updates” or “marketing trends”. Hence, the OR operator is usually used when we want the tool to match any of the given keywords.

Then, while refining your search on the following step, you might notice there are options to give context to keywords or phrases (number 1 on picture below) and exclude keywords (number 2):

This is where AND and AND NOT operators come into play.

While in the Basic options, you don’t need to enter them alongside your keywords. Simply click on the desired action, add your keywords and press Enter after each one. Let’s go through them in more detail.

AND

Give context to your words/phrases” option would be equal to the Boolean operator AND. It will ensure that the tool tracks only those mentions where both (or more) of your keywords are present (so, not either one or the other keyword, as was the case with the OR operator – but both). 

For example, I might want to track mentions of Mediatoolkit’s blog. I’ll simply enter ‘blog’. You don’t need to repeat any of the keywords you’ve previously added, as you’ve already set them in the second step of setting up a query (in this case, it’s ‘Mediatoolkit’), as seen in the picture below:

So, we’re already tracking keyword “Mediatoolkit”, but now we want to expand on that using the “Give context to your keywords/phrases” option, i.e. the AND operator.

Simply enter your keyword in the text box shown above and press Enter:

Now, you’ll receive mentions that contain both the “Mediatoolkit” and “blog” keywords.

AND NOT

“Excluded keywords” option is the same as the Boolean operator AND NOT. By adding it, you are adding what is commonly known as negative words, i.e. words you don’t deem as relevant for your query

Let’s say I want to track Mediatoolkit, but not when it’s mentioned alongside football in this case. So, if we add ‘football’, we’ll get all the articles and posts mentioning Mediatoolkit, but not those in which Mediatoolkit appears with the word football.

2.3.2. Advanced options

You might have noticed there is an Advanced Settings option below the Basic options we’ve just talked about.

Advanced options section is a more complex one, but nonetheless, it can be easily mastered. It allows a very precise determination of your query, hence yielding even more relevant results. When you click on the Advanced options, this is the screen you’ll see next:

At any given moment, you can click on the Back to basic options to return to the previous step, or click on the Back button below:

On your left side is the area in which you’ll manually add all your keywords and operators:

On your right side, there is a little reminder of all the Boolean operators with examples of how they are used. Other than the aforementioned AND, OR, and AND NOT operators, there are quite a bit new options here:

Just scroll down or up this window to see all operators and their descriptions.

Let’s see what each of these does:

NEAR/N

NEAR/N operator enables you to track only mentions in which Keyword 2 appears a specified (N) number of words after Keyword 1. In order to do so, replace the N with the desired number of words between your keywords.

For example, you might want to track posts in which people look for suggestions of the best restaurant at a certain location. Typing out something like this…

…would result in tracking mentions that contain the phrase “best restaurant” near “Zagreb”, our location, in the text of the mention.

 

AT LEAST/N

AT LEAST/N operator allows you to set a minimum number of added keywords that have to be present in a mention in order to appear in your search results.

So, we could add a query such as the one below.

As a result, our feed would show articles and posts that contain at least four of the keywords. If there’s a post with, for example, “media monitoring”, “real-time” and “relevant information”, we would not get that mention in our feed in this case, as the minimum of keywords is set to 4.

 

ASTERISK

Asterisk (*) is an operator which replaces any number of signs. Use it to easily track different variations of the same word, without the need to write every single one down. 

Let’s say we want to track everything related to cooking. We could track the following:

Adding an asterisk after your keyword means your results will include mentions of everything that contains “cook” in the word. So, that would mean that you would receive “cook” in your mentions, but also mentions of cooks, cooking, cooker, and so on. You can always use negative words to refine your results if their scope is too wide.

 

QUESTION MARK

A question mark (?) is an operator that replaces one or no sign. If you put a question mark after your keyword, as a result, you would get mentions of all the posts that (might) contain exactly one letter more than your keyword. 

So, if we set tracking for the query below,

our results would contain mentions of “mediatoolki” or “mediatoolkit” or any other sign that could replace the question mark (but doesn’t have to).

 

FULL STOP

A full stop (.) is an operator that replaces exactly one sign that must appear. Let’s clarify it using an example such as this one:

For such a query, our results would include mentions of “books”, “cooks”, “looks”, etc. Basically, if a full stop can be replaced with a letter to form a meaningful word mentioned anywhere online, it will be present in your feed.

 

/CS

/CS is shortened from case sensitive. As the name suggests, it is an operator that makes sure you only get mentions with capitalized letters, for example, if distinguishing uppercase from lowercase is important for your query. There are two ways to use the /CS operator

At the very start of setting up your query, you will enter your desired keywords. When you type one out and press Enter, it will be shown inside a blue rectangle signalling that your keyword is added. You might notice a symbol next to our keyword, consisting of one uppercase and one lowercase letter:

That’s the /CS operator. You can simply click on it in this step to mark your keyword as case sensitive. That will open a new window:

To confirm the selected keyword or a phrase is case sensitive, click on the box:

Then, select in which sections you want the case sensitivity to be valid in – all of them or only in the title, description or the text of the post in which it is mentioned (click on the one you want in the drop down menu as shown below):

To save your choice, click on the green Save button.

The other way to use this operator is to enter it manually while in the Advanced options. Add it right after your keyword like this:

Keep in mind that any mentions of your keyword that are not written in the exact manner you specified, be it uppercase or lowercase, will not show up in your results.

 

BACKSLASH

When you want to track a full stop or a question mark as a part of your keyword or a phrase, you may need to use the backslash (\) operator. 

As we mentioned before, both of the two are also operators, so when we want to track them, rather than use them to track something, we should add a backslash before the full stop or question mark in our keyword.

So, if you wanted to track the phrase “how are you?”, you would write it down like this:

Not adding a backslash would mean that the question mark is not a part of our keyword, but an operator that replaces one sign.

 

QUOTATION MARKS

The quotation marks (“ “) operator is used when tracking a phrase. By adding a quotation mark before and after your phrase, you differentiate an exact phrase you wish to track from an array of standalone keywords.

So, returning to our first example of marketing news, updates, and trends, you could enter those phrases like this:

 

ORDER – /ORDER

This operator is used for tracking a specific word order.

This query will match “Mediatoolkit has an order operator”, but not “Order operator is one of many operators in Mediatoolkit”.

 

TITLE

The TITLE operator is used for tracking keywords within titles of the articles.

This means that Mediatoolkit has to be mentioned in the title for a mention to appear.

 

OCCURS

OCCURS operator defines how many times a keyword must appear in the article.

 

BOOLEAN OPERATORS COMBINED

To get the most relevant results possible, you can use multiple Boolean operators simultaneously! Now that you know what each one of them does, it’s easy to combine them. When doing so, use brackets to determine which operators connect with desired keywords. 

We’ll use a more complex example here – let’s track the Blackberry smartphone. Instantly, we can predict that using ‘blackberry’ as a keyword without additional context will provide results that also include mentions of blackberry, the fruit.

As we know, BlackBerry with capital ‘B’s is how the company is titled and most usually mentioned. To start, we should use the case sensitive operator:

Secondly, let’s use the operator AND to specify we want to see mentions of Blackberry only if they’re alongside ‘smartphone’ or ‘company’.

Finally, we need to remove mentions of blackberry the fruit from our mentions. Rather than doing it manually after the tool has found all the mentions, let’s use the Boolean operator AND NOT to ensure our results won’t contain those mentions in the first place.

Another option is to click on Advanced settings option and enter all of the operators manually:

 

To conclude

Now that you’ve finished this tutorial, Boolean operators should be a piece of cake. If you’re more of a pizza type, though, check out this awesome infographic about Boolean operators based on pizza

If you’re still stuck with the process of refining your search by using Boolean operators, don’t hesitate to reach out via chat or email. Our Customer Service team would love to help!

2.4. Setting up global filters & sources

If you want to include or exclude certain parameters from your search, you’ve come to the right place. In this tutorial, we’ll go through all the ways you can filter your search results.

There are two ways to filter your mentions: while setting up a query and after setting up a query. 

If you’re afraid you won’t be able to edit your filters after setting up a query – don’t worry. You can definitely do it, and we’ll cover how in this tutorial.

2.4.1. Filtering while setting up a query

When setting up a query, you can filter your results by language, location, authors, influence score and sentiment.

Language

You can track specific languages, as well as exclude languages from your results. Click on the search box and a drop down menu with all available languages will appear:

If you already have a language in mind, start typing – if it is available it will appear for you to click on:

The process is exactly the same for excluding a language.

 

Location

As was the case with the Languages filter, with the Location filter you can track specific locations or exclude locations.

To include a specific location (or locations) start typing to check if the wanted location is available, or choose a location from the drop-down menu:

To include a location in your search, just click on it:

Same goes for excluding a location from your search. First you choose a location from the drop-down menu,

and then you click on the location to exclude it:

Author

Similar to the previous two filters, you can track specific authors, or exclude them from your results (e.g. specific Twitter profiles). For obvious reasons, there is no drop-down menu for this filter, so simply type in the name of the author(s) you want to include/exclude.

 

Influence score

This filter allows you to filter your mentions so the feed shows only those mentions with a pre-set influence score (on a scale of 1 to 10). To choose a rank, drag the blue circle to a preferred lowest rank:

For instance, you can adjust your feed so it shows only those mentions with the influence score ranking from 7 to 10 (as in the example above).

 

Sentiment

You can filter your feed to show only mentions with positive, negative, neutral or undefined sentiment. You can choose only one type of sentiment or multiple (e.g. only show positive and neutral sentiment). To choose the sentiment, simply click on the boxes on the right side of each sentiment:

2.4.2. Editing filters (i.e. filtering after setting up a query)

If you haven’t filtered your results before starting your tracking (i.e. while setting up a query), or just want to edit the existing filters – you can easily do it.

Here’s how.

To access filters, first click on the query you want to filter (for this tutorial’s purpose, we’ve chosen a query that had filters applied when it was set up). Then click on Edit query above the feed (OR click on the small settings icon () on the right of the query. In the drop-down menu that appears, click on Edit query).

OR

A new window will open:

To get to filters, click on Global filters from the menu on the left of the screen:

These are the exact same filters we’ve gone over at the beginning – the filters you can use when setting up the query.

Let’s get into a little more detail now.

Language

You can see in the picture above that we’ve already made it so that our feed excludes the mentions in German (underlined in the picture above). We can now edit that. Simply click on Language to expand this filter.

For instance, if we now want to include German in our feed, we just click on the little X of the red rectangle. This will remove German from the Exclude option of the Language filter.

If you want to add new languages or exclude another language, click on the search box of either the Track specific language or Exclude option, and in the drop-down menu of all available languages click on a language(s) you want to use. If you already have a language in mind, start typing that language and, if it is available, the tool will suggest it. Just like a Language filter when setting up a query.

Location & Authors

The process is the same as previously mentioned for the Location and Authors filter.

Influence score

In this example, the influence score has a set rank of 7 to 10. To change it, simply drag the blue circle horizontally left (towards 0) or right (towards 10), to choose a preferred rank.

Sentiment

If you’ve already filtered your mentions by sentiment (e.g. positive and neutral), but now want your feed to show mentions with a negative sentiment, too – just click on the box on the right of the word negative.

On the other hand, if you want to remove a sentiment, click on the green checked box again. That will remove it, and unchecked sentiments won’t show up in your feed.

2.4.3. Setting up sources

To edit sources, click on Sources in the menu on the left of the Edit query window:

There are 8 different sources from which Mediatoolkit pulls its mentions:

  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Reddit
  • vKontakte
  • TripAdvisor
  • Comment
  • Forum
  • Websites

You can choose to track all sources – in which case you just have to click on the circle next to Track all sources at the top of the window:

If the circle is blue (as in the picture above), that means tracking all sources option is on.

To track individual sources, click on the circle next to the source you want to track. To deactivate a source, click on the (now blue) circle again.

Aside from tracking everything from a certain source, you can also track, or exclude from tracking, specific social media profiles, websites, domains or forums.

Websites

To access this feature for Websites, simply click on the Website source in the Sources window.

Right now, you can see that Mediatoolkit is tracking all websites. However, to track a specific website, click on Specific websites:

Type the website you want to track in the text box. For instance, we want to track our own website (mediatoolkit.com). To do that, we typed in mediatoolkit.com, and pressed Enter:

To add another website, just type that one into the text box, too:

To exclude a website from your mentions, click on All websites except:

The process is the same as with tracking a specific website. Simply type in the website you want to exclude, and press Enter:

The exact same process applies to all other sources. It applies to all social media sites: Twitter, Youtube, Reddit and vKontakte. For Twitter, you can track all Twitter profiles, or add or exclude profiles. The same goes for Youtube channels, Reddit subreddits, and vKontakte walls.

For TripAdvisor you can track all or add and exclude specific hotels. Comments source allows you to track comments from all websites, or add and exclude comments from specific domains. Last, but not least – Forum source allows you to track all forums or add and exclude specific ones.

To save your edit – click on Preview results and then click on Save.

 

Hopefully this helps! However, if you need additional help, click on Help on the top right of the window (next to a question mark icon). In the drop-down menu that appears, click on Help me filter results.

In the window that pops up, choose how you would like to be contacted (phone, e-mail or other). If you choose Other, there’ll be a box in which you can explain how you would like to be contacted.

Click on the green Ask for help button to finish.

2.5. Feed filters

You can sort mentions in the feed by clicking on the filters at the right side of the feed. This option helps you to get specific mentions and data about them in the feed (and consequently in the reports).

NOTE: This option helps you sort the feed and the mentions in it in a desired way, it does not change your queries and filters.

You can find feed filters on the right side of the feed:

Let’s take a look at all available feed filters.

 

SET DATE RANGE

Set date range allows you to filter your mentions by a time period.

There are two ways you can set a date range:

1) Hover your cursor over the “From” and “Until” date boxes. When you do this, a drop-down menu with available time periods will appear:

Click on a time period to apply it. Your feed will automatically filter your mentions to match the chosen time period.

2) Click on the “From” and “Until” date box. That will open a calendar. To set a date range, just click on a date in the calendar:

SORT BY

You can sort the mentions by time (this is the default option for feed overview), reach or virality.

Virality is an estimate of how much more an article is popular in comparison to other articles from that same website.

Reach shows us the estimated number of people that have seen the article or post.

 

If you sort the mentions by time, the mentions will appear from the most recent to the oldest. If you sort the them by reach or virality, the mentions will appear from those with the biggest reach (or virality), to the smallest.

SHOW ONLY

The “Show Only” option filters the mentions by their source:

For instance, if you click on the “Web” source, that means your feed will only have mentions sourced from web. If you click on “Twitter”, you’ll only receive Twitter mentions, and so on.

Additionally, on the right of each source you can see the exact number of mentions for that source:

SHOW ONLY SENTIMENT

This one filters your mentions by a specific sentiment:

If you click on a “Positive” sentiment, your feed will only show those mentions that have a positive sentiment.

OPTIONS

There are three additional options:

 

If there is a check mark next to an option, it means it’s turned on. When the option is off, there is no check mark.

 

  • Show reversed order

This options reverses the order in which your mentions are shown in the feed – and it is related to the way you sort mentions.

We’ve already covered that there are three ways you can sort mentions: by time, by reach and by virality.

Say your mentions are sorted by time (which is a default setting). Originally, mentions are sorted from the most recent to the oldest mentions. If you click on “Show reversed option”, mentions will be sorted in a reverse order. That is, from the oldest to the most recent.

Same goes for reach and virality. Originally, your mentions are sorted from the biggest to the smallest reach (or virality). Once you click on this option, they are sorted from the smallest to the biggest reach.

  • Group similar mentions

This one’s straightforward – it does exactly what it says. For instance, retweets. To avoid overcrowding your feed with the exact same tweet (i.e. mention), you can click on “Group similar mentions” to group all those tweets in one mention. You’ll know it is a grouped mention because it will say so under the mention title:

You’ll be able to know who all retweeted it due to the “Also on” information within the mention.

This also works exceptionally well when there’s a viral post. Instead of having your feed overpopulated with that one post from all over, group all those similar mentions into one. Enjoy a clearer version of your feed, and don’t miss some other important mention.

  • Show images

This option makes it possible to choose whether or not you want to have images in your feed. The default setting for this option is to have it on, but you can turn it off just by clicking on it. For instance, if you have a Twitter mention (that includes both the image and the caption), and your “Show images” option is off, you’ll only see the caption, but not the photo.

2.6. Understanding feed & mention data

After setting up your queries and filtering your feed results, it is important to understand each mention that appears in your feed.

Let’s take this mention, for example:

This, and every other mention in the feed contains the following data:

1) Title

2) Location – geographical location of each mention.

3) Source

Right below the title, on the left is a small icon that indicates the source of the mention. In this example, that’s Web – and, more specifically, Mediatoolkit web page (known by the website name on the right of the web icon).

Other sources:

4) Time

Time shows you when the mention was published.

5) Caption

6) to 9)

6) Reach
Number 6 on the picture above. Reach shows an estimated number of people who saw this mention. 

To measure reach, Mediatoolkit uses data such as the number of people visiting each website or the number of Twitter followers. We use information from companies providing commercial web traffic data and analytics to determine the number of visitors to a certain website, both locally and worldwide. We then use algorithms to calculate the probability that an article mentioning you and your business will be read by the site’s visitors. The reach of a query is determined by more than just merely thenumber of visits to an article: we also take into account the article’s positioning (homepage or a less-read section of the site), the number of times a query was mentioned and its position in the article (top-bottom). The number of shares on social media (e.g. Twitter) increases the number of people who saw the article, so we also factor this in.

When it comes to social media sharing, we use data on the average reach of each post, tweet or blog. For example, only a certain percentage of Twitter followers will see a user’s post when it’s published so we also take this percentage into account to determine the final number. Simply said, reach is our best assessment of the number of people who saw that particular mention.

7) Interactions 

Number 7 on the picture above. Interactions indicate the number of people who have liked, commented, or shared the post. 

8) Engagement rate

Number 8 on the picture above. Engagement rate shows the percentage of people who interacted with the post after seeing it (likes, comments, shares). It is calculated by dividing Interactions with the Reach.

9) Influence score

Number 9 on the picture above. Influence score shows source influence ranked on a 1 to 10 scale, indicating how influential that particular source is in comparison to every other source on the internet. An influence score of 1 means the source has a small audience, while 10 is typically reserved for globally influential websites or social media profiles with millions of followers (for example, CNN website or social media accounts from Oprah or Elon Musk).

10) Automated sentiment

Automated sentiment is located on the far left of the mention, in a green, red or grey dashed vertical line. The color of the line depends on the sentiment. If the sentiment is positive, the line is green, if negative, the line is red, and if neutral, the line is grey.

In our example, the sentiment is positive, so the dashed line is green:

If you decide the automated sentiment does not correspond to a particular mention, you can easily change it. Which brings us to number 11), sentiment.

11) Sentiment

For instance, if your mention has a neutral sentiment, but you believe it should be a positive one – you can determine the sentiment on your own. When you determine the sentiment, it looks like this:

It is no longer a dashed, but rather a full line.

*To change the mention’s sentiment, click on the mention and in the pop-up window on the right click on the sentiment you want to set (in the example below, we’re changing the sentiment from neutral to positive):

2.7. Removing & blocking mentions

If you feel a certain mention isn’t relevant, you can easily remove it from the feed. Not only that, but you can also stop receiving mentions from a particular source by blocking it. Let’s get into this in more detail.

Removing mentions

To remove a mention from the list, hover the cursor over the mention you want removed, and click on the X that appears. This will open a drop-down menu:

In the drop-down menu, click on Remove this mention from the list (as shown above). This action will only remove that one mention from the feed (and will do so immediately, it won’t ask you if you’re sure), and mention will be marked as irrelevant.

Blocking mentions

To access the blocking option, click on the X on the right of a specific mention to open a drop-down menu (as was the process for removing mentions). In the drop-down menu, you’ll notice that you can block a mention from a specific source, a specific language or block a specific source:

1) Blocking mentions from a specific source

If you want to stop receiving mentions from a particular source, click on ‘Block mentions’ from a specific source (this action can be applied to any website or social media profile). You will no longer receive mentions from the blocked source. If you decide at any time that you would like to start receiving mentions from blocked sources, go to Edit filters and remove the source from blocked sources.

For instance:

2) Blocking a source

If you want to stop receiving mentions from Websites in general or a social media site, click on ‘Block mentions’ from type (e.g. Web, Twitter, Youtube, Disqus). You will no longer receive mentions from the blocked source. If you decide at any time that you would like to start receiving mentions from blocked sources, go to Edit filters and remove the source from blocked sources.

3) Blocking mentions from a specific language

If you want to stop receiving mentions in a particular language, click on ‘Block mentions’ from a specific language. You will no longer receive mentions in the blocked language. If you decide at any time that you would like to start receiving mentions in the blocked language, go to Edit filters and remove the language from blocked languages.

2.8. Mention overview & Collections

Mention overview

Mention overview gives you a deeper insight into each particular mention. It will tell you what language your mention is in, its sentiment, social media statistics (reactions). Additionally, you can create tags to better sort out your mentions. Let’s dive in.

To access a mention overview, click anywhere on the blank space of a mention. Mention overview will appear on the right side of the feed, where the filters are usually positioned:

 

Mention overview contains the following data:

  • Date & Time: at the very top of the overview you can see the exact date and time a mention was published:

 

  • Mention language & an option to translate the article to the language that you have chosen for the interface. If you want to translate a mention, click on the green Show in English.

This will automatically redirect you to translate.google.com page where you can read the post translated to a language you’ve chosen for the interface (e.g. if it is an article, it will automatically translate the whole article).

Above the translate option, you can see the original language of the mention.

 

  • Sentiment: you can see the automated sentiment of the mention (in the example below, the sentiment is positive). However, if you feel the mention should be negative or neutral, you can change it simply by clicking on Neutral or Negative.

  • Tags: you can tag each mention depending on what’s important for you. For example, you can track your company’s name and tag each article depending on the context in which the company is mentioned, e.g. company in general, CEO, stock exchange, etc. You can use tags to sort mentions into various topics.

To add tags, click on +Add Tags:

In the place of +Add Tags, a box will appear in which you can type the name of your tag:

Once you type the name, click on Add new tag:

Your tag will appear under Unsorted tags. You can add multiple tags in the same way.

You can also manage your tags. Click on the green Manage tagsin the top right corner of the tags section. This will open a new window:

In this window you can create a new category (a category is a set of tags), you can add new tags within a category, you can delete tags and/or categories and you can rename the categories.

To create a new category, just click on Create new category:

Then, in the box that appears, type in the name of the category, e.g. company:

Click enter, and your category will be created:

To create a new tag under a specific category (e.g. our newly created one), click on the small arrow pointing down on the right of the category name.

Then, to add a new tag, simply click on Add new tag and type in the name of your new tag. Click enter to finish creating the tag.

To rename categories or tags, hover your cursor over a tag or a category you want to edit. Click on the pen icon that appears:

Then, simply type in a new category name in the green highlighted area:

The renaming process for tags is the same as the one for categories.

To delete a tag or a category, hover the cursor over the tag or category you want to delete. Click on the trash bin icon that appears:

When you click on the trash bin icon, a window will pop up asking you if you’re sure you want to delete that tag:

If you are sure you want to delete it, just click on the green Yes button.

 

  • Social media statistics: at the mention overview you can see statistics about shares and comments on social media. For websites you can see detailed statistics about:
  1. number of comments, upvotes and downvotes on Reddit,
  2. number of shares on Linkedin,
  3. number of pins on Pinterest.

For Twitter, you can see the number of retweets and favorites:

  • Statistics about reach and virality (among a number of other statistics):

 

Collections

Somewhat similar to tags, Collections allow you to group selected mentions in a collection you can then save and access at a later time. There is no default setting for collections, as you create your own under any name you want, with any mentions you want.

To access Collections, go to the analyst mode in the feed, by clicking on Analyst in the upper right corner of the feed:

When you click there, this is how your feed will look like:

On the far right, you’ll notice that, in the place of feed filters, are now Collections:

To select mentions you want to include in a collection, simply click on a circle to the left of the mention:

Once you’ve selected all mentions you want to include in your collection, take a look on the right side of the feed. There you’ll see the number of mentions you’ve selected, as well as the name of your collection:

To edit the name of your collection, click on the pen icon to the right of the name, and type in the collection name you want instead:

To save the name, press Enter.

To view all the mentions you’ve selected for your collection, click on mentions selected:

This will open a new window with a list of all selected mentions:

To go back to the list of all your collections, click Go back to list:

Here you’ll be able to see and access all your collections:

To delete a collection, click on the trash bin icon to the left of the collection name:

If you click there, a new window will appear, asking you if you’re sure you want to delete that collection:

If you are sure you want to delete it, just click Yes and your collection will be deleted.

2.9. Reports: All charts explained

Reports give you insight into topics you’re tracking. They are a graphic representation of data collected from all your mentions. 

Mediatoolkit has two types of report dashboards: predefined and custom. In this tutorial, we’ll focus on predefined dashboards and reports.

There are three predefined report dashboards:

  • Basic report
  • Advanced report
  • Competitive analysis

To access any of these three dashboards, click on Reports above the feed:

Once you click on Reports, you will be redirected to a page with all the dashboards:

2.9.1. Basic report dashboard

To access the basic report dashboard, click on the Basic report square:

Your basic report dashboard will appear:

Basic report gives you an overview of mentions and sentiment.

Before studying the graphs, you can choose a topic you want analyzed and set up a preferred time period.

Choose a topic

To choose a topic, click on Choose query or folder and a drop-down menu will appear:

You can choose an entire folder to analyze (in the example above: My company, Competitors, Paper) by clicking on it, or a specific query inside the folder.

To choose a query, click on the little arrow on the left of a folder to open a drop-down menu of queries:

Click on the query, or on the plus icon (+) on the right, to choose a query you want analyzed:

You can choose multiple folders and/or queries, just repeat the same process for all topics you want to analyze.

 

Time period

There are two ways to set a time period:

1) Hover over the date box with the cursor to open a drop-down menu:

Just click on the time period you want applied to your topic.

2) Click once on the date box to open a calendar:

Do this for both the “From” and “Until” date box. By clicking on the “From” box, you open a calendar in which you choose a date marking the start of a time period. By clicking on an “Until” box, you open a calendar in which you choose a date marking the end of a time period.

To apply the topics and time period you’ve chosen, click on the blue APPLY button on the far right.

Once you’ve clicked Apply, the dashboard will refresh with the following charts:

  • Number of mentions
  • Total impressions
  • All sources
  • Mentions over time
  • Sentiment Analysis
  • Sentiment by sources
  • Locations
  • Word Cloud

NOTE: Every chart has a refresh feature. Hover your cursor over the chart and the refresh button will appear in the top right corner. See Number of mentions chart for example.

NUMBER OF MENTIONS

This graph shows you the total number of mentions in the selected time period. Below the number of mentions is a percentage (in green) – showing a change in the number of mentions compared to a previous period:

If you click on the number of mentions, you can see all mentions in the new window that pops up:

Same goes for mentions in the previous period – click on the percentage to open a window with mentions from that period.

To refresh the chart (i.e. update the data), hover the cursor over the chart. Click on the refresh button that appears in the top right corner:

 

TOTAL IMPRESSIONS

This graph shows the total number of impressions in the selected time period. The number of impressions is based on the reach the mentions had in that same period.

As was the case with the number of mentions, the percentage below the number of impressions shows change in the number of impressions compared to a previous period.

 

ALL SOURCES

This graph shows all the sources from which the mentions were pulled, as well as the share of each source. To see the share of each source, hover your cursor over the source – this will enable you to see the exact number of mentions from that source, as well as its percentage (as you can see on the picture):

When you click on a specific source, a new window will pop up in which you can see all the mentions from that source.

Also, you can download this graph by clicking on the three dashes in the top right corner. A drop-down menu will pop up, and then just click on the format you want to download:

MENTIONS OVER TIME

This graph shows how your mentions performed over the selected time period. It can show you the peaks and the drops, if the number of mentions fluctuated or was relatively constant. If you notice the peaks (as there are in the picture above), you can find out what caused the peak by clicking on it (as shown in the picture below).

This will open a new window where you can see all mentions from that day:

 

 

SENTIMENT ANALYSIS

Sentiment analysis graph shows the ratio of positive, negative and neutral sentiment of your mentions:

Actions you can take on this graph:

Number 1 on the picture: By hovering the cursor over the sentiment (e.g. positive sentiment, the green piece of the pie chart), you can see exactly how many mentions were in a positive tone (both the total number and the percentage). 

Number 2 on the picture: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Another thing you can do is see all the mentions of each specific sentiment. For instance, if you want to see which all mentions were positive, you can do so by clicking on that sentiment. This will open a window with the list of all positive mentions:

You can export these mentions by clicking on the blue Export Mentions button in the bottom left corner of the window (you can see it in the picture above).

 

SENTIMENT BY SOURCES

This graph shows you the distribution of sentiment by sources. That means that you can see the ratio of positive, negative and neutral sentiment for each specific source, as shown in the picture below:

Number 1 on the picture above: By hovering the cursor over the sentiment (e.g. positive sentiment, the green part of the bar), you can see exactly how many mentions were in a positive tone (both the total number and the percentage) for a specific source (in this example for web).

Number 2 on the picture above: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Another thing you can do is see all the mentions of each specific sentiment for each specific source. For instance, if you want to see which web mentions were positive, you can do so by clicking on that sentiment for web. This will open a window with the list of all positive web mentions.

 

LOCATIONS

This graph/map shows you the countries from which your mentions originated, as well as the total number of mentions per country. The darker blue the country is, the more mentions came from it.

Number 1 on the picture above: By hovering the cursor over a country, you can see the total number of mentions that came from it.

Number 2 on the picture above: You can zoom in on the map (click on the plus (+) sign) and zoom out (click on the minus (-) sign).

Number 3 on the picture above: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

To see the mentions from a particular country, you can click on that country to see a list of all mentions that came from it.

 

WORD CLOUD

Word cloud shows you the context in which your topic was mentioned the most. The size of the keyword increases proportionally to the number of times it was mentioned. The more the keyword was mentioned, the bigger the word in the word cloud (and vice versa, the less the keyword was mentioned, the smaller the word).

Number 1 on the picture above: By hovering the cursor over a word, you can see the number of times it was mentioned.

Number 2 on the picture above: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, by clicking on a word, you open a window with a list of all the mentions containing that keyword.

 

Downloading Basic report

To download the Basic report in its entirety, click on the blue DOWNLOAD button in the top right corner of this dashboard.

2.9.2. Advanced report dashboard

To access the advanced report dashboard, click on the Advanced report square:

Your advanced report dashboard will appear:

Advanced report gives you a more detailed overview of your mentions than a basic report. 

Before studying the graphs, you can choose a topic you want analyzed and set up a preferred time period:

The process for setting up the topic and time period is exactly the same as on a Basic report dashboard.

To apply the topics and time period you’ve chosen, click on the blue Apply button on the far right (see on the picture above).

Once you’ve clicked Apply, the dashboard will refresh with the following charts:

  • Mentions over time (see: Mentions over time chart in Basic report)
  • Number of mentions (see: Number of mentions chart in Basic report)
  • All sources (see: All sources chart in Basic report)
  • Total impressions (see: Total impressions chart in Basic report)
  • Mentions over time by source
  • Positive-negative sentiment ratio
  • Top influencers by number of mentions
  • Top influencers by source
  • Top influencers by reach
  • Locations (see: Locations map in Basic report)
  • Top locations
  • Top languages
  • Sentiment ratio (see: Sentiment analysis chart in Basic report)
  • Sentiment ratio by channel (see: Sentiment by sources chart in Basic report)
  • Sentiment over time
  • Top influencers by sentiment
  • Word cloud (see: Word Cloud chart in Basic report)

NOTE: Every chart has a refresh feature. Hover your cursor over the chart and the refresh button will appear in the top right corner, as was the case for Basic report dashboard.

 

MENTIONS OVER TIME BY SOURCE

This graph shows how your mentions performed over the selected time period for each specific source.

Number 1 on the picture above: By hovering your cursor over the graph line on a specific date, you can see the exact number of mentions by source on that day. If you click on a graph line specific to one source, e.g. a Website graph line, a window with a list of all Website mentions on that day will pop up.

Number 2 on the picture above: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, you can exclude a source from the chart by clicking on that source’s name on the top of the graph:

You’ll notice that, in this example, web is excluded from the graph, and you can no longer see the web graph line on the chart (you’ll know a source is excluded by the grey color of that source on the top of the chart; circled on the picture above).

To include the source back on the chart, simply click on that source again on the top of the chart (you’ll know the source is back on the graph if it’s colored again and if that source’s graph line shows on the graph).

 

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE SENTIMENT RATIO

This graph shows the ratio of positive and negative sentiment.

Another thing you can do is see all the mentions of each specific sentiment. For instance, if you want to see which mentions were positive, you can do so by clicking on that sentiment. This will open a window with the list of all positive mentions. You can also export those mentions by clicking on the blue Export Mentions button in the bottom left corner:

 

TOP INFLUENCERS BY NUMBER OF MENTIONS

This is a list of top 10 influencers who mentioned you the most. On the left are influencers, and on the right the number of times an influencer has mentioned you:

If you click on an influencer, a window with a list of all their mentions will pop up.

 

TOP INFLUENCERS BY SOURCE

This graph shows who mentioned you the most on each source. The list of influencers is separated into columns – each column corresponding to one source:

When you click on an influencer for one source (for instance, @mediatoolkit on Twitter), you’ll see all mentions from the influencer (@mediatoolkit) originating from that source (Twitter).

 

TOP INFLUENCERS BY REACH

This list shows the influencers whose mentions had the biggest reach for each source individually. It is separated into columns – each column corresponding to a source. On the left of each column is the influencer, and on the right is that influencer’s reach.

By clicking on an influencer, you open a window with a list of that influencer’s mentions.

 

TOP LOCATIONS

This is a list of top ten locations by the number of mentions, i.e. it shows you a list of the countries that produced the most mentions for your query:

By clicking on a country, you’ll open a window with a list of all mentions from that country.

 

TOP LANGUAGES

This is a list of the most frequent languages on which your mentions were published.

If you click on a language, you’ll open a window with a list of all mentions published in that language.

 

SENTIMENT OVER TIME

This graph shows positive, negative and neutral sentiment over a selected period of time.

Number 1 on the picture above: If you hover your cursor over a specific date, you’ll be able to see the exact number of positive, negative and neutral mentions.

Number 2 on the picture: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, if you click on a sentiment graph line, e.g. a positive sentiment line graph, on a specific date, a window will pop up. In this window, you’ll be able to see a list of all positive mentions on that day.

Another thing you can do is exclude a sentiment from the graph. You can do this by clicking on a sentiment on the top of the chart:

In the example above, you can see that the neutral sentiment is excluded, and no longer shows on the chart (you’ll know a sentiment is excluded by the grey color of that sentiment on the top of the chart; circled in the picture above).

To include the sentiment back onto the chart, just click on the sentiment again (you’ll know it is included if that sentiment is now again colored and its graph line shows on the chart).

 

TOP INFLUENCERS BY SENTIMENT

This list shows the influencers that mentioned you the most in a positive and negative sentiment. There are two columns – one column is for positive sentiment, the other for negative:

If you click on an influencer, you’ll be able to see a list of all their mentions in the window that pops up.

 

2.9.3 Competitive analysis dashboard

To access the competitive analysis dashboard, click on the Competitive analysis square:

Your competitive analysis dashboard will appear:

The competitive analysis report offers you a comparison between queries. This is why you have to choose at least 2 topics (folders and/or queries)

To choose topics, you go through the same process as you did for basic and advanced reports.

Choosing topics

To choose topics, click on Choose query or folder and a drop-down menu will appear:

You can choose an entire folder to analyze (in the example above: My company, Competitors, Paper) by clicking on it, or a specific query inside the folder.

To select a folder, click on the plus sign (+) on the right of that folder, and to choose a specific query inside a folder click on the little arrow on the left of the folder (as you’ll see is circled in the picture on the next page). That will open a drop-down menu of queries. Further explanation given in the example that follows.

For the purpose of this tutorial, we’ll choose the folder Competitors, and more specifically, two queries inside that folder (Adidas and Nike). Click on the arrow on the left to open a drop-down menu:

Click on the query, or on the plus icon (+) on the right, to choose a query you want analyzed:

Note: In the picture above, Adidas is already selected (that’s why there is a little X on right of that query instead of the plus sign). If you click on that X, you can remove Adidas from the analysis. To choose Nike, too, we clicked on the plus sign (inside the green box to the left of that query).

Once you’ve selected your queries for the competitive analysis (in our case, Nike and Adidas), it’ll look like this:

You can choose multiple folders and/or queries, just repeat the same process for all topics you want to analyze.

If you’ve changed your mind, and no longer want to analyse those two queries (or only one of them), you can remove them by clicking on the X on the right of each query.

Setting a time period

We’ve already explained how to set up a time period in the Basic report section.

 

Once you’ve set up queries and time period and clicked Apply, the dashboard will refresh with the following charts:

  • Total mentions per query
  • Share of voice
  • Total mentions per channel
  • Total impressions
  • Share of impressions
  • Total impressions per source
  • Mentions over time for multiple queries
  • Top influencers
  • Number of mentions per sentiment
  • Mentions by channel

NOTE: Every chart has a refresh feature. Hover your cursor over the chart and the refresh button will appear in the top right corner, as was the case for both Basic and Advanced report dashboard.

 

TOTAL MENTIONS PER QUERY

This graph shows you the comparison between the total number of mentions for selected queries. Below that number is the change in the number of mentions compared to a previous period (in percentage).

Click on the number of mentions to open a window with a list of all mentions, and the percentage change to open a window with a list of all mentions from the previous period.

 

SHARE OF VOICE

Share of voice acts as a measure of reach, and as such shows the share of exposure for selected queries. This graph shows the ratio of mentions between selected queries:

Number 1 on the picture: If you hover your cursor over the chart, you can see the total number of mentions (as well as the percentage) each query has accumulated.

Number 2 on the picture: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, if you click on a pie chart part, e.g. for Nike, a window with a list of all Nike mentions will pop up.

 

TOTAL MENTIONS PER CHANNEL

This graph shows the number of times each selected query was mentioned on a particular channel. This way you can compare queries’ mentions across channels.

Number 1 on the picture: If you hover your cursor over a chart bar for a specific query (e.g. Nike) on a specific channel (e.g. YouTube), you can see how many mentions that query had on that particular channel.

Number 2 on the picture: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, if you click on a chart bar, you’ll open a window with a list of all mentions for a query on a specific channel.

 

TOTAL IMPRESSIONS

This graph shows the total number of impressions for each query in the selected time period. The number of impressions is based on the reach the mentions had in that same period.

The percentage below the number of impressions (in green) shows a change in the number of impressions compared to a previous period.

If you click on the number of impressions, it will open a window with a list of all impressions (mentions), and if you click on the percentage change, it will open a window with a list of all mentions from the previous period.

 

SHARE OF IMPRESSIONS

This graph shows the ratio of impressions for selected queries.

Number 1 on the picture: If you hover your cursor over the chart, you can see the total number of impressions (as well as the percentage) each query has accumulated.

Number 2 on the picture: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, if you click on a pie chart part, e.g. for Nike, a window with a list of all Nike mentions will pop up.

 

TOTAL IMPRESSIONS PER SOURCE

This graph compares the distribution of impressions across sources for selected queries:

Number 1 on the picture: If you hover your cursor over the chart bar, you can see the total number of impressions for each query per source.

Number 2 on the picture: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, if you click on a chart bar, you’ll open a window with a list of all mentions for a query on a specific channel.

 

MENTIONS OVER TIME FOR MULTIPLE QUERIES

This graph shows how your mentions performed over the selected time period for each specific query:

Number 1 on the picture: By hovering your cursor over the graph line on a specific date, you can see the exact number of mentions for each query on that day. If you click on a graph line specific to one query, e.g. an Adidas graph line, a window with a list of all Adidas mentions on that day will pop up.

Number 2 on the picture: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

Additionally, you can exclude a query from this chart by clicking on that query’s name on the top of the graph:

In the example above, you can see that Nike has been removed from this chart (you can see that the chart no longer has the Nike graph line, and that the Nike query on the top is colored grey). 

To include Nike back in the graph, just click on the Nike on top of the graph again. You’ll know it is back on the graph once the word Nike is colored again, and the Nike graph line is back on the graph.

 

TOP INFLUENCERS

This graph shows the top ten influencers for each selected query. Those are the influencers that mentioned a query the most. You can see the influencer on the left of this graph, and the number of mentions per each influencer is on the right.

If you click on an influencer, you’ll open a window with a list of all mentions from that influencer.

 

NUMBER OF MENTIONS PER SENTIMENT

This graph shows the distribution of positive, neutral and negative sentiment for each selected query:

Number 1 on the picture above: By hovering your cursor over a sentiment for a specific query, you can see the total number of positive mentions. If you click on a sentiment (e.g. positive) for a specific query (e.g. Nike), a window with a list of all positive mentions for Nike will appear.

Number 2 on the picture above: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

 

MENTIONS BY CHANNELS

This graph shows the distribution of mentions for each selected query across different channels:

Number 1 on the picture above: By hovering your cursor over a chart bar for a specific query on a specific channel, you can see the total number of mentions for that query on that channel (e.g. the total number of mentions for Adidas on web). Additionally, if you click on the chart bar, you’ll open a window with all mentions for that query on a specific channel.

Number 2 on the picture above: You can download the chart by clicking on the three dashes icon in the top right corner of the graph.

2.10. Custom dashboards & charts

If your business needs require more than the three default dashboards and charts, customising is the way to go. You can create a completely new, personalised dashboard.

In this chapter, we’ll show you how to create, but also edit custom dashboards.

2.10.1. Creating a custom dashboard

To create a custom dashboard, click on the Reports button on the top of the screen. In the window that pops up, you’ll see the three default dashboards, as well as a Create a custom dashboard option. Click on the plus sign to create the dashboard.

A new window will open up:

There are three steps you need to take in this window.

Step 1

Naming your dashboard. If you are creating a custom dashboard, you already know what you need it for – let the dashboard name reflect that. For the purpose of this tutorial, we’ll name it New Dashboard.

Step 2

To start a new dashboard, click on Custom Dashboard.

Step 3

Choose your source. Click on the drop-down menu Choose query or folder, and choose either a query or folder from which you want to pull data for your dashboard. You can choose multiple folders or queries.

Click on the green Create button to create your custom dashboard.

Once you’ve clicked Create, a new window will open:

That is your new dashboard.

2.10.2. Custom charts

Next step is adding charts to your dashboard. To do this, click on the plus sign: Add new chart.

In this window that pops up, you can choose from the list of predefined charts,or you can create a custom chart. To create a custom chart, click on the Custom chart option or type “custom chart” into the search box at the top of this window:

After you click Save, a new window will open again.

To finish creating your custom chart, you’ll have to go through eight steps (all in that new window):

1) Choose a topic to analyse

Even though you’ve already chosen a folder (or folders) for your custom dashboard – you can still edit that choice for each chart.

In the drop-down menu, click on a query or folder whose data you want displayed on the chart (HINT: to display queries within a folder, simply click on the little arrow on the left of the folder name, and then click on the query (or queries) you want).

2) Choose a chart type

There are 17 chart types. To choose one, simply click on the chart type you want to use.

3) Chart time

In this step, you can set up the time period for your chart. You can choose between hour or day as a time step (click on one or the other in the Time step drop-down menu).

If you choose Hour, you can adjust between which hours in day you want to analyze mentions.

For setting the date, you have two options:

  • Click on the date box (From and Until) to open the calendar. Then click on the dates you want to set.

  • Hover over the date box with your cursor. When you do this, a drop-down menu will appear. In this menu, you can click on the time frame you want to apply to your chart:

If you want to compare data with a different period, click on Compare periods. In this case, you can only use the calendar option to set the time period (by clicking on the date boxes).

4) Main dimension

This step includes choosing the main dimension you want to analyze.

There are 11 different dimensions:

  • Feed
  • Time
  • Source type
  • Sentiment
  • Manual sentiment
  • Effective sentiment
  • Language
  • Location
  • Influencer
  • Tag
  • Word

In the main dimension drop-down menu, just click on the dimension you want to analyze and you’re ready for the next step.

5) Sorting

In this step, you can choose between sorting by key or value. Then, you can choose if it will be in a descending or ascending order.

To choose either ascending or descending, click on the arrow on the right of the drop-down menu. The picture above shows the descending option (circled in red).

If you are sorting by key, that means the data will be sorted chronologically (for instance, if your chosen dimension is Tag, your data will be sorted by the time the tags were created).

On the other hand, if you are sorting by value, that means your data will be sorted, for instance, from the biggest to smallest value (or vice versa, depending on whether you chose the ascending or descending order).

Examples

Picture 1. Descending order (sentiment sorted by value); chart type: Numbers

Picture 2. Ascending order (sentiment sorted by value)

6) Trim

If you want to limit your results – for instance, only include Top 10 Influencers, and not all of them – you use the Trim option.

There are five trim conditions. To choose either one, just click on them. 

Trim conditions:

  • Top N: limit the number of results on the chart (e.g. the above mentioned Top 10 Influencers):

  • Non zero: this option excludes data if the result is 0:

  • Allowed: includes only parameters entered (just type parameters you want included in the box; press Enter after each parameter you type out):

  • Rejected: excludes entered parameters (type parameters in the box and press enter after each parameter):

  • Merge other: you can define the rank (after which the data will no longer appear) or percentage (below which the data will no longer appear):

 

For instance, if you choose sentiment as your main dimension, you can trim the results by using the trim condition Rejected (this way, you can exclude sentiment that is undefined simply by typing that word in the Rejected box and pressing Enter):

Same would go for an instance in which you maybe want to exclude some sources from a particular chart. Say you don’t want your custom chart to include web mentions. You can achieve this by typing “web” into the rejected trim option. However, keep in mind you can only do this if your dimension is source (main or sub dimension).

Tips & tricks: 

Adding trim conditions: If you want to use more than one trim condition, click on Add new trim condition, after defining the first one.

Deleting trim conditions: If you change your mind, you can always delete the trim condition by clicking on the trash bin icon on the right of every trim condition.

Removing parameters: Additionally, you can remove the Rejected or Allowed parameters by clicking on the X on the right of each parameter.

 

7) Sub dimension

In addition to your Main dimension, you can also choose a Sub dimension you want analyzed. You activate it by clicking on the little box on the left of Sub dimension title.

For the sub dimension, you can sort and trim the data in the same way as the Main dimension.

Additionally, you can switch the sub dimension with the main dimension by clicking on the arrows icon on the right of the sub dimension title:

What happens here is that the sub dimension becomes the main dimension, and the main dimension becomes the sub dimension.

 

8) Chart value

The chart value option allows you to choose between five value options:

  • Count 
  • Reach
  • Interactions
  • Virality
  • Influence score

In the drop-down menu, just click on the one you want:

There is also a Merge operator option that allows you to choose if your data will be shown as a sum, minimum, maximum or average:

To finish creating your custom chart, click on the green Save button. 

 

2.10.3 Editing & deleting custom charts

Let’s say this is your custom made chart:

Pay attention to underlined features. This is what every custom chart has.

So, you can always:

  • Rename your custom chart by clicking on this icon:

Once you click on it, just type in the new name for your chart in the green highlighted area:

Click on the X or press Enter to change the name.

  • Clone your chart to get the exact same chart you already made by clicking on this icon:

  • Edit your custom chart by clicking on the pencil icon in the top right corner of the chart on your dashboard:

  • Delete your chart by clicking on the trash bin icon in the top right corner of the chart:

  • Refresh your chart by clicking on this icon:

  • Adjust chart width by clicking on this icon:

This will open a drop-down menu of all available chart widths:

 

Renaming, customizing & deleting a custom dashboard

To rename your custom dashboard, click on the pen icon on the right of the dashboard’s current name (circled red):

When you click on it, an Edit dashboard window will open (as shown in the picture above). In this window you can change the name of your dashboard, as well as your dashboard’s description.

To customize your custom dashboard, click on the Customize dashboard option on the upper right of the screen, next to the blue Download button. When you click on it, new window will pop up warning you that all charts will change if you edit any of the filters.

If that is not a problem for you, click Yes.

Once you click Yes, a new window will appear:

In it, you can change the topic you want analyzed and the time period. Click Apply to finish editing.

To delete your custom dashboard, click on the trash bin icon found to the right of the dashboard name:

A window will pop up asking you if you are sure you want to delete your dashboard. If you are, simply click Yes and your dashboard will be deleted.

To download your custom dashboard, click on the blue Download button on the top right of the dashboard.

2.11. Exporting reports

If you want to share your reports with your clients or colleagues, or just want a simplified overview of your mentions, you can export reports.

The first step is to click on the Export tab.

When exporting, you have two options:

1) Export reports immediately

2) Receive scheduled reports

The Export immediately option allows you to receive your report via email in just a few moments. Simply choose between the Excel spreadsheet or PDF format. Once you do, you’ll get a confirmation of your report being on the way.

This is an example of the email you’ll receive:

You can also choose the Receive scheduled reports option if you want automatic and periodic updates on your query. Once again, choose the format of your report (Excel or PDF).

After that, a pop-up window will appear with options to activate daily or weekly email digests and custom email alerts:

To set up a daily email digest (1), tick that box and choose the preferred time to receive your report. For a weekly email digest (2), set the time and day of the week that best suits you.

You can also select to include or exclude similar mentions, just like you can filter your feed. Choose the option that you prefer, depending on how brief you need your report to be.

The last option is to set up custom email alerts. By selecting this option, you can choose the exact time and days of the week you wish to receive an alert from a selected number of days.

The other possibility is to choose a timeframe – you can set up receiving a report via email every 12 hours, for example:

Furthermore, you can add multiple custom alerts by clicking on the Add more custom alerts. Thus, you can combine receiving a weekly report on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and a custom email alert every 12 hours, for example:

In conclusion

Exporting your reports is an easy process. Within seconds, your report will be waiting in your email inbox for you to share with your colleagues or further analyze the data. Set up receiving your reports on a daily, weekly or a custom basis to always be in the loop.

2.12. Alerts & Digests

Having the right information at the right time is pure gold, especially with the ever-changing business landscape. Now, imagine how priceless it is to be the first one to know. 

Luckily, Mediatoolkit enables you to get real-time notifications whenever your brand is mentioned anywhere online. In this guide, you’ll learn how to enable notifications and digests and receive them via email, mobile push notifications or Slack. Let’s begin!

2.12.1. Setting up

The first step is always the same. Click on the folder you want to set up the alert for, and then click on the little bell icon on the top of the screen.

After clicking on the bell icon, a new window will pop up. In this window you’ll be able to choose the alert type you want to set up:

Real-time email alerts

Real-time alerts notify you about new mentions as they appear online and are typically set to six alerts per hour. This is why, after you click on this alert type, you’ll have to click agree on the box notifying you about the possibility of your inbox filling up. Then click Save and there you go – you’ve set up real time alerts.

Daily and weekly email digest

If you set up a daily email digest, you’ll receive a daily overview of all your mentions. To set them up, in the alerts window click on Daily email digest, and then, using the option Receive an email at, type in the exact time at which you want to receive your digest every day. Click Save, and voilà – daily mentions activated.

You can see how setting up a daily email digest looks at the picture below:

In the example above, the time is set at 8 AM. This means you’ll receive your mention digest every day at 8 o’clock in the morning.

Weekly email digest is a weekly overview of your mentions. You can set up the exact day of the week, and time at which you want to receive the digest. In the box next to Receive an email at, type in the time of the day and then choose a weekday from the drop-down menu. For instance, you can choose to receive this digest every Monday at 8 AM:

Custom email alerts

When it comes to setting up custom email alerts, you have two options:

1) Exact time

2) Timeframe

1) Exact time

To set up custom alerts at an exact time, you need to go through three steps.

Step one: set up the time you want to receive your emails at, by typing the time into the box (as shown below):

Step two: click on a weekday (or weekdays) on which you want to receive an email. For instance, Monday, Wednesday and Friday:

Step three: choose to receive mentions accumulated over a specific time period. In the drop-down menu click on either minutes, hours or days. Then type in the number of minutes (days, months). For instance, if you’ve set it up in the previous step so you receive the digest every two days, you can choose to receive all mentions from the last 48 hours. This way you’ll know you haven’t missed any mentions.

After going through all three steps, what you can get out of exact time custom alerts is this: I want to receive mentions every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 8 AM – and when I receive them, I want them to be from the last 48 hours.

 

2) Time frame

To set up a time frame for receiving alerts, click on the Time frame option in Custom email alerts. Then, in the drop-down menu choose between 1 and 12 hours. If you set it up for 12 hours, it means you will receive mentions every 12 hours:

*If you want to set up more than one custom alert, just click on Add more custom alertsand repeat the same process (for both the exact time and time frame custom alerts).

For all alert types you can choose to either: Exclude similar mentions or Include similar mentions.

 

2.12.2 Mobile alerts

To set up mobile alerts click on the Settings button () in the top right corner of your screen. In the drop-down menu, click on Alert settings:

 

In the window that opens up, click on the drop-down menu in the top right corner, and then click on either Android or iOS push (depending on your smartphone’s operating system).

 

Once you’ve clicked on an operating system (for instance, you chose Android push), your Alert Settings window will look like this:

To turn on mobile alerts, click on the Settings button () on the right side of the folder for which you want to turn on those alerts (circled in the picture above). In a window that pops up, click on the box for Real time alerts, and then click Save:

2.12.3 Slack Integration

To integrate your alerts into Slack, click on the Settings button () in the top right corner of your screen. In the drop-down menu, click on Alert settings:

In the drop-down menu on the right, click on Slack channel:

Click on the Add to Slack button:

This will open a new Tab:

You can select a Slack channel on which you’d like to receive your alerts. Click Authorize to complete the Mediatoolkit – Slack integration.

 

2.12.4 Turning off alerts

To turn off alerts, head to Alert settings. In the window that opens up, click on the green Turn OFF all alerts button in the top right corner:

New window will pop up, asking if you’re sure you want to turn off all the alerts. If you are, just click Yes.

That’s it! Now you can monitor at ease with the alerts set-up knowledge under your belt.

However, if you do need additional help – feel free to contact our Customer Service team. Simply click on the blue chat button in the bottom right corner of the screen and ask away.

The End

Congrats – you’ve reached the end of this all-encompassing journey!

We hope this how-to guide will help you easily get started with our tool and give you a better understanding of all Mediatoolkit features.

As always, feel free to contact our Customer service team for any and all additional questions you may have.

You can click on the chat button in the lower-right part of your Mediatoolkit screen, or click on Help on your upper-right while using the tool, and then on Help me filter results to have someone from our team contact you in the way that suits you best (phone, email, etc.).

Happy tracking!

Klara Gavran

Part of the Mediatoolkit marketing team. Fanfiction and sleep enthusiast dabbling in content creation.

Iva Anušić

Part of the Marketing team at Mediatoolkit.
Passionate about digital marketing and psychology. Dreams about adopting every shelter dog out there.